Navarathri : How to Observe? [ Oct, 2002 ]


prainbow61
I understand this festival starts in four days. I would like to mark it in some way and I've not been able to find information that feels accessible for me. I appreciate any information that you can share.

Devi Bhakta
There is really no one way to observe Durga Pooja/ Navratri "correctly" -- but, on the other hand, there's almost no way you can observe it incorrectly! The important thing is to *observe* it -- the best you can, and in your own way. Devi will know, and She will appreciate, your effort, however technically perfect or imperfect.

Navratri is a very old holiday, and it can be a very elaborate one -- our own Chumki (blueblackeyes) compares its emotional and ceremonial import in West Bengal to that of Christmas in the West. And as with Christmas, there are many differences in approach both from region to region, and from family to family. On the more popular side, there are recitations of the Chandipath (Devi Mahatmya), and the Devi- Bhagavata-Purana; elaborate temple cermonies and processions -- and much noise, color, music and mayhem; almost like Mardi Gras in Rio or New Orleans.

Complete, traditional religious observance requires a deep and complex knowledge of temple ritual and the Sanskrit language, as well as materials that most common people in India -- never mind people in the West -- cannot readily get hold of. Among the pandits, additionally, there is a split of opinion over whether the Devi Mahatmya is more important for its mantric value (i.e., the intrinsic spiritual energy of its sound) or its substantive content (i.e., the moral and theological teachings contained in its stories and hymns). Moreover, a "complete" mystical observance involves complicated individual poojas on each of the nine days for each of the nine forms of Durga (Navdurgas; see more on the homepage). And members of various initiatory traditions have their own unique observances, based on the instruction of their respective gurus.

Now: I do not say any of this to discourage you -- on the contrary, I hope it gives you a sense that (again, like Christmas), Durga Pooja/Navratri is not something that you can really do wrong. The important thing is that you do observe it and that you give fully of yourself and your devotion in doing so.

If there is a Hindu community of any size where you live, you might choose to let them take the lead. Call the local Hindu temple (or perhaps even better, the proprietor of a good Indian grocery -- they know *everything* that's happening in the community) and ask whether there are any special Durga Pooja events scheduled. If so, go! Watch, enjoy, listen, and -- if you feel welcome and so moved -- get involved yourself. Have fun! If you have any practicing Hindu friends, let them know that you're interested in sharing any private Durga Pooja observances they may be planning with their family. More than likely, they'll be surprised and complimented by your interest and happily invite you to participate.

Even if you have to "go it alone," it's no great disadvantage, In some ways, it's even better and more intimate. For example, if you have an idol of Durga Mahishasuramardini, wash Her thoroughly each day. Annoint Her with sandalwood oil and red turmeric (kumkum) paste (both easily available at Indian groceries). Light candles and/or incense for Her; offer Her beautiful, fresh flowers each day. Offer Her delicious fresh fruits and freshly cooked rice; split a cocunut, and offer it to Her as if it were Your own head, inviting Her to fill it with Her essence. Play devotional music, preferably Shakta hymns, etc. When you can, sit down at Her feet and recite Her mantra, meditate upon Her, recite from the Devi Mahatmyam and.or Devi Bhagavata Purana.

Begin each of the nine days early, spending some time alone in devotions to Her in the predawn hours; during these days, it is not a bad idea to rise at two or three in the morning and spend several hours with Her before you begin your mundane obligations. Tuesday, Friday and Saturday are especially powerful days to do this. Stop in with Her again last thing before going to bed at night. Open yourself to Her as far as you are able, and let Her fill you. By the time the nine nights are over, you should have gone through the Devi Mahatmya several times. If you're unable to devote that much time, the online Devi Mahatmya linked off the homepage's Mahishasura Mardini presentation is prefaced with a suggestion for spreading one thorough reading over the nine days. You should do this even if you also participate in the public celebration.

My main message, I guess, is: Do *something*! Do not get trapped in the process of analyzing the "correct" approach, because there isn't one. The main thing is that you remember and observe the holiday in your own way. It's okay to do research and learn more about the details, but do not overly "intellectualize" the holiday. Feel it, don't "think" it! It is the primary holiday of the Goddess. Make that understanding a part of yourself, absorb the profundity of this truth -- and then act, observe, celebrate and give thanks as your mind and spirit direct.

Hsias Alega
devi_bhakta wrote: There is really no one way to observe Durga Pooja/ Navratri "correctly" -- but, on the other hand, there's almost no way you can observe it incorrectly! The important thing is to *observe* it -- the best you can, and in your own way. Devi will know, and She will appreciate, your effort, however technically perfect or imperfect.

What does that mean? The way in which a Navaratri should be observed is clearly written in the Devi Bhagavatha. Of course I agree with you that itz difficult to follow exactly as written here in US. Nevertheless one has to read that and try their best to keep up to the rules. And regulations.

Initiates follow their teacher's instructions. That is the "right way" for them. Non initiates can refer to Devi Bhagavatha for a "correct approach". Even while refering to Devi Bhagavatha avoid something if it says recite such and such mantra. Stotras can be chanted as you like. Remember mantras require initiation.

Among the pandits, additionally, there is a split of opinion over whether the Devi Mahatmya is more important for its mantric value (i.e., the intrinsic spiritual energy of its sound) or its substantive content (i.e., the moral and theological teachings contained in its stories and hymns).

Morals from Chandi Path? I dont remember any. Please do touch upon'em if you don't have time. Even the "traditional religious observeance" doesnt need much knowledge of sanskrit. It can be done if you know how to pronounce the sanskrit mantras correctly.

As far as I see, both are important. For philosophical and theological importance you may refer to Bhaskararaya's commentary on Chandi Path by name Guptavati. of course its importance as a source of mantras is well discussed in major tantras.(Katyayani Tantra for ex: which many scholars quote)

Related topics :
THE ESOTERIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE DEVI-MAHATMYA By SRI SWAMI KRISHNANANDA.
Devi Mahatmyam and the four Sthudhis

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